letsbeachourselves:

Where I was last weekend. Hundred Islands, Pangasinan
Photo credit: Gina Sanoy

letsbeachourselves:

Where I was last weekend. Hundred Islands, Pangasinan

Photo credit: Gina Sanoy

Source: letsbeachourselves

zone101:

This is love ♥

Source: zone101

Patupat Making Factory

My grandmother loved it when I went home with this. Patupat is malagkit or “sticky rice” cakes wrapped in coconut leaves and then cooked in pure sugar cane extract. Sweet doesn’t even begin to describe this favorite and classic Pinoy dessert snack. This patupat making factory is located at Brgy. Imbalbalatong, Pozzorubio, Pangasinan.

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The entire setup is pretty simple. All of the machines and implements are under a basic lean-to right next to a field of sugarcanes. Freshly cut sugarcane lie in piles all around the farm.

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Karlo (http://www.karlodl.com/) and Nina (http://justwandering.org/) being serious seriously.

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Sugar canes straight from the field go into the machine press. The juice is extracted then goes into a cauldron.

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The pure cane extract is collected in a huge cauldron.

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Workers mix coconut milk with the sugarcane.

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The patupat itself is a sticky (glutinous) rice stuffed inside a basket weave made out of coconut leaves. One end is open so that you can fill half of the “basket” with the uncooked sticky rice. The basket is then closed with a knot.

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The basket weave looks very intricate. Just imagine people giving so much effort just to make this kind of wrapper.

This batch hasn’t been dipped in the boiling cauldron of sugarcane juice, yet. You can see some of the sticky rice oozing out.

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The patupat is placed in a basket then dipped into the boiling sugarcane mix to cook. The entire process gives the patupat its sweet flavor as the juice seeps inside the basket weaves and into the sticky rice.

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What happens to the sugarcane juice after all the boiling? It’s made into panutsa, an unrefined whole cane sugar by-product.

The boiled sugarcane juice is poured into half-cut coconut shells and left to harden. Once dry, that’s the panutsa.

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The finished product. Not quite ready for the market yet since it still needs some time to cool down. Sometimes it can be served warm, depending on taste.

Source: theeverydaycommuter

oressaprodigalidad:

Starfish
Dasol, Pangasinan
December 2010
Camera used: Nikon D90

oressaprodigalidad:

Starfish

Dasol, Pangasinan

December 2010

Camera used: Nikon D90

Source: oressaprodigalidad

mitzed:

Lighthouse \ Bolinao, Pangasinan \ Philippines 2011

mitzed:

Lighthouse \ Bolinao, Pangasinan \ Philippines 2011

Source: mitzed

siopaopropaganda:

Bolinao, Pangasinan, Pilipinas.

siopaopropaganda:

Bolinao, Pangasinan, Pilipinas.

Source: violentlyvicky.deviantart.com

prinsesang-iniwan:

Calasiao, Pangasinan, Philippines

prinsesang-iniwan:

Calasiao, Pangasinan, Philippines

Source: bukas-na-libro

dreamdevourinspire:

Our Lady of Manaoag Church

Pangasinan, Philippines

Sept 9.2011

These are some snapshots I took, which at first I’m hesitant to do, but I did. :P Street/People photography is something I’m not used to do because I’m too shy to approach people but it is something I envy about to almost photo hobbyist out there. [ I need the guts!] So basically all photos of people, even the hand of the kid lightning a candle are all stolen shots. Towards the end of the set are foods commonly available there, (foodie here :P) that might be unusual to some, the kakanin (the one that was artistically and alternately wrapped in coconut leaves), the tupig (the one wrapped in banana leaf), and the puto of the Pangasinan which is the best puto I’ve tasted so far. I tried to summarize my “Manaoag Photo Set” with these ten photos (because tumblr only allow maximum of ten per set), I mean only nine because I’m leaving you a photo of myself, the last photo (talagang kaylangan may picture ako para proof/personal touch haha) and the only picture I had that day.Yes, Everyday is bad hair day. :P

#Just Sharing

Source: dreamdevourinspire

piewunderkind:

Unda-Unday
It’s a Pangasinan/Ilocano delicacy made with powdered sticky rice, coconut milk, brown sugar and grated coconut flesh. I don’t know if this is native to the region because, as we all know, Ilocos Region is largely influenced by the Spanish Colonizers.
It’s good I did not leave for Baguio yet. This is one of the very few foods Mommy can cook perfectly.

piewunderkind:

Unda-Unday

It’s a Pangasinan/Ilocano delicacy made with powdered sticky rice, coconut milk, brown sugar and grated coconut flesh. I don’t know if this is native to the region because, as we all know, Ilocos Region is largely influenced by the Spanish Colonizers.

It’s good I did not leave for Baguio yet. This is one of the very few foods Mommy can cook perfectly.

(via piewunderkind-deactivated201205)

manilenyanglakwatsera:

October 29, 2011.
Solomon’s Paradise greeted us with… a paradise. Beautiful place! ♥
If you’re looking for relaxation up north, Bolinao is a must-visit, and Solomon’s Paradise is definitely a great place to stay. It is a small and quiet resort near the famous Cape Bolinao Lighthouse (which we weren’t able to visit, by the way), which has Cliff Diving as its main attraction. The waters were rough though, so cliff diving was discouraged during our visit.
Will write a review about Bolinao and Solomon’s Paradise, soon :)

manilenyanglakwatsera:

October 29, 2011.

Solomon’s Paradise greeted us with… a paradise. Beautiful place! ♥

If you’re looking for relaxation up north, Bolinao is a must-visit, and Solomon’s Paradise is definitely a great place to stay. It is a small and quiet resort near the famous Cape Bolinao Lighthouse (which we weren’t able to visit, by the way), which has Cliff Diving as its main attraction. The waters were rough though, so cliff diving was discouraged during our visit.

Will write a review about Bolinao and Solomon’s Paradise, soon :)

Source: manilenyanglakwatsera